• October 12, 2015 at 11:44 am #23555
    D
    Keymaster

    I understand why it didn’t make the album but it would’ve worked great with Fingerprint File as a B-side.

    October 12, 2015 at 12:56 pm #23563
    VT22
    Participant

    Typically early 7-tees Stones, the guitars sound great. I like the use of the Wah-wah. Not a great composition, although an extended Taylor guitar solo could have lifted this song to a higher level.

    October 12, 2015 at 1:05 pm #23571
    trumplefingers
    Participant

    I think this remains my favourite of the unreleased gems and I’m not sure quite why this is still unreleased.

    Lead single off Tattoo You Too! perhaps?

    October 12, 2015 at 2:55 pm #23587
    Dreamer
    Participant

    I always thought this is a great song. Should have been on GHS…wasn’t that the one it was ment to be on..? Dandy?

    October 12, 2015 at 3:10 pm #23588
    CindyC
    Participant

    This song rocks my socks off.   I freaking love it.

    Best part is at 2:54.

    I wish they would release it now, NO REMIXING.   They need to keep that durty sound.

    Wasn't looking too good, but I was feeling real well

    October 12, 2015 at 4:10 pm #23603
    Naturalust
    Participant

    Friggin’ GREAT Stones tune. Although, unlike Cindy, I believe it could benefit from a slight remix. But one think that I wouldn’t change a bit it the way the vocals are done. Great doubling and harmonies by Mick buried just enough in the mix to produce that classic Stones sound.  Something that has been sorely missing from all the modern records. I actually believe that if the vocals were similarly done on the later releases there would be much less bitching and moaning about them.

    October 12, 2015 at 4:12 pm #23604
    71Tele
    Participant

    Who’s on bass? Sounds a little busy for Bill.

    October 12, 2015 at 4:36 pm #23611
    stonehearted
    Participant

    It was intended for Goat’s Head Soup. A Rolling Stone magazine press report ahead of the album’s release listed this title as one of the tracks being mixed at Island Records, but it didn’t make the final cut for inclusion on the album.

     

    Regarding the bass, because this song was demoed in Jamaica, perhaps Bill wasn’t around for the recording. It sounds more melodic and higher up in the register than Bill typically plays, which leads me to think it’s Keith on bass.

     

    Despite that the song has a fine enough melody,  I think it was a wise choice to leave it off the album. The overall effect of GHS is superb; maybe not every track is a masterpiece, but the flow of the album from start to finish is perfect. Which track from that album would you have withheld to include this outtake instead?

     

    But in the case of a reissue, and the next and most obvious choice for a deluxe album re-release would have to be GHS, surely this track would be included. The only question is, what would Mick do in terms of remixing? You know he’d never settle for leaving old tracks alone, as we have seen in the Brown Sugar reissue, where inevitably up to the minute production values would be applied. He would overcompress the track and ruin the effect. And Criss Cross Man is a fine example of how the Stones of the early seventies could rock with a “mellow edge”–a quality of subtlety that would no doubt be ruined with a modern “brickwalled” remix.

    October 12, 2015 at 5:55 pm #23625
    DandelionPowderman
    Participant

    Criss Cross MIND. Great groove. Eventually going nowhere. Nice outtake.

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    BBB - Bring Blondie Back

    October 13, 2015 at 7:55 am #23666
    Dreamer
    Participant

    It was intended for Goat’s Head Soup. A Rolling Stone magazine press report ahead of the album’s release listed this title as one of the tracks being mixed at Island Records, but it didn’t make the final cut for inclusion on the album. Regarding the bass, because this song was demoed in Jamaica, perhaps Bill wasn’t around for the recording. It sounds more melodic and higher up in the register than Bill typically plays, which leads me to think it’s Keith on bass. Despite that the song has a fine enough melody, I think it was a wise choice to leave it off the album. The overall effect of GHS is superb; maybe not every track is a masterpiece, but the flow of the album from start to finish is perfect. Which track from that album would you have withheld to include this outtake instead? But in the case of a reissue, and the next and most obvious choice for a deluxe album re-release would have to be GHS, surely this track would be included. The only question is, what would Mick do in terms of remixing? You know he’d never settle for leaving old tracks alone, as we have seen in the Brown Sugar reissue, where inevitably up to the minute production values would be applied. He would overcompress the track and ruin the effect. And Criss Cross Man is a fine example of how the Stones of the early seventies could rock with a “mellow edge”–a quality of subtlety that would no doubt be ruined with a modern “brickwalled” remix.

    Exactly: just a perfect flow…

    October 13, 2015 at 12:36 pm #23692
    andrew t
    Participant

    Side Two is a little clunky. Ending with the tepid studio version of Star Star is a head scratcher.

    Back to the song – Criss Cross is great. Sure it’s mostly a groove, but at this period in their career, the Stones were so locked in Mick could read the phone book over a tasty jam like this and it would be terrific. It bubbles and grinds with effortless menace, and sonically it’s a swampy treat. Mick’s drawling delivery of “blood transfuuuusion” and “daaarling” is a great example of the kind of proprietary phrasing that, along with Keith’s rhythm, and Charlie’s snare and hi-hat, identifies this a Stones song in under five seconds. Most bands can only dream of having such a quickly identifiable sound. Or a b-side or outtake that’s as compelling.

    October 15, 2015 at 2:03 am #23842
    LongBeachArena72
    Participant

    With the exception of “Hillside Blues,” I don’t think I’ve ever heard a Stones outtake and thought, “damn, they were idiots for leaving this off” whatever record they were making at the time. I think there are two possible reasons for this: a) Mick and Keith are experts at what they do and perfectly capable of choosing which of their songs are worthy of inclusion on a Stones record, or b) I do not have the ability to imagine how a rough outtake might sound if it were “finished” off up to the band’s standards.

    This song is a good example: great groove, funky early 70’s wah-wah out of its mind, but ultimately wandering and a bit generic. I’m not a huge fan of GOAT’S HEAD SOUP … but what would it have replaced? I agree with Stonehearted & Dreamer that that record’s “flow” probably doesn’t allow for “Criss Cross Mind.”

    For some reason, I want to compare this to “Everything’s Turning to Gold.” Which one wins, in your opinions?

    October 15, 2015 at 3:06 am #23847
    sonomastone
    Participant

    My guess is that Keith is the one who stopped it from being released because it was too copy-cat glam-rock, which it is, or Mick blocked it because it is not a finished song as others have pointed out, or both.

    The most value to be gained from listening to this era of the Stones is to adequately appreciate the audacity and strength of the comeback they made on Some Girls. After IORR, who could have guessed the band would ever make another great album?

    October 15, 2015 at 6:45 am #23909
    DandelionPowderman
    Participant

    When I first heard We Had It All I immediately thought «why on earth isn’t this one released». Luckily, they came to their senses 🙂

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    BBB - Bring Blondie Back

    October 15, 2015 at 7:08 am #23912
    andrew t
    Participant

    Tough call, LongBeach.

    But now that you mention it there are many similarities between CCM and EITTG.

    I love both tunes, maybe I’d give Criss Cross a slight edge, though EITTG is a better party tune.

    October 15, 2015 at 7:38 am #23915
    DandelionPowderman
    Participant

    The three (or four?) versions of EITTG from Place Pigalle are rock history! Fabulous, nothing but excellent, imo. At the same time, that one suffered by the need for other tracks on SG. There wasn’t really a need for a funky jam tune in there, just like a hard-rocking tune like Criss Cross Mind wouldn’t make a good fit on GHS.

    But what about Living In The Heart Of Love from 1974? I find that one a tad stronger than Criss Cross Mind.

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    BBB - Bring Blondie Back

    October 15, 2015 at 7:43 am #23918
    DandelionPowderman
    Participant

    Here’s one of the extended versions:

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    BBB - Bring Blondie Back

    October 15, 2015 at 7:52 am #23923
    Marianita
    Participant

    Oh yeah D.Powderman, this one is awesome. Thank you for reminding me.

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

    October 15, 2015 at 9:48 am #23938
    Breath
    Participant

    it’s one of their greatest mediocre outtakes ever. on this I think there can be no debate.

    October 15, 2015 at 4:54 pm #23992
    LongBeachArena72
    Participant

    Tough call, LongBeach. But now that you mention it there are many similarities between CCM and EITTG. I love both tunes, maybe I’d give Criss Cross a slight edge, though EITTG is a better party tune.

    I think so, too, Andrew. In listening to CCM and EITTG again today I realized that although I have always professed to NOT be a Taylorite, perhaps I actually am? I used to say that I just liked that period of the band because the material was so much better, and that I didn’t like post-74 because the songs were (in general) not as good. But I might have been kidding myself just a bit. With Taylor in the line-up there was always a chance of something odd, unusual, unexpected cropping up. Something lovely. (I also feel this way about Brian’s contributions, too.) The Stones were such an instrumentally INTERESTING band, even though none of them (with the possible exception of Taylor, I guess) could be considered a virtuoso. In EITTG, while it’s inarguably a GREAT groove (and that’s no small accomplishment in itself), it just feels like it grinds on and on, without the possibility of taking flight with some weird and wonderful phrase, some combination of instruments that allows the jam to soar. Nothing at all wrong with the tune, just seems circumscribed a bit by its players and by a lack of imagination on the part of the Glimmers; they used to be able to ELEVATE a tune — after the Taylor years they seemed more earthbound.

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