14

  • October 28, 2015 at 6:02 pm #25696
    StrongBeach
    Participant

     

    14

    October 28, 2015 at 6:36 pm #25698
    stonehearted
    Participant

    Well, the Adele clip would have 115,000,001 if I’d viewed it, but I haven’t nor will I bother to–same with that Meghan Trainor clip, which will have to rely on someone else to give it that billionth and oneth viewing. And I don’t feel like I’m missing anything because I’m 49, not 19 or 29. I’ve never been happier to be completely out of touch with younger generations. I can’t remember the last time I even spoke at length to someone under 30–must have been 5 years now, at least.

     

    And it’s no tragedy that many millions of people have never bought or heard a million selling pop single from over half a century ago, just as it was no tragedy that millions of young people in 1964 weren’t exactly grooving to the hits of 1914. By the way LongBeach, without Googling, can you name one popular song from 1914? When was the last time you had a listen to pop music of that era? Does the absence of any 1914-ness from your life lead you to feel that you may be missing out on something essential?

     

    Sure, pop music remains a big part of people’s lives, just as other forms of entertainment do, like television, theater, and cinema. Without it there’d only be work and sleep, lives of endless boredom and drudgery.

     

    Only, it isn’t our century anymore….

    (By the way, this video clip has 4,500 views–4,501 now thanks to yours truly)

    October 28, 2015 at 6:51 pm #25701
    treaclefingers
    Participant

    It’s a long way to Tipperary…or something

    October 28, 2015 at 6:56 pm #25702
    stonehearted
    Participant

    It’s a long way to Tipperary…or something

    Can’t get there from here! But just in case, better fill it up, ’cause it sounds like you got a long drive ahead.

    October 28, 2015 at 7:56 pm #25705
    Naturalust
    Participant

    A couple important points here:

    First you can’t compare YouTube views to records sold or even the number of people who are hearing these songs. There is probably some girl in Utah who watches the video 100 times a day while watching herself dance in the mirror, and 1000’s more just like her scattered around the globe. Each time they watch it it is considered a view. Think about how many times you listened to your favorite tune, YouTube has become  player for a lot of people, young and old.

    Secondly companies like Vevo are known for botting videos of their most promoted artists. It was rampant and somewhat transparent at one time and since they were called out on it it has gone somewhat underground, but I can tell you for sure it still happens regularly. I actually have a friend who’s company has been given a contract to do just that! He’s had to sign a mountain of non-disclosures (and probably wouldn’t be to happy to know I was talking about him) but since I’m not divulging any real information I’m ok with it. Vevo is a marketing arm of a conglomeration of different record companies, they are using every trick in the book to promote certain artists and pump up the hype, YouTube views is just part of the hype. One billion views? Bullshit I say.

    Finally to answer the question I though was being asked from the thread title. I always thought music was somewhat less important overall to next generation of kids than it was to us. Just speaking from my kids and the many kids I know, they tend to have more broad media interests than I did at their age. Things like video games, other videos like sports, pranks, etc, social media, etc etc. When I was a kid music was a HUGE part of my life and we valued it more because we had to actually pay for it. But this is just my personal observation, perhaps it’s the same or even more. I’m sure some sociologist has studied it…it’s an interesting question.

    October 28, 2015 at 10:08 pm #25711
    StrongBeach
    Participant

    A couple important points here: First you can’t compare YouTube views to records sold or even the number of people who are hearing these songs. There is probably some girl in Utah who watches the video 100 times a day while watching herself dance in the mirror, and 1000’s more just like her scattered around the globe. Each time they watch it it is considered a view. Think about how many times you listened to your favorite tune, YouTube has become player for a lot of people, young and old. Secondly companies like Vevo are known for botting videos of their most promoted artists. It was rampant and somewhat transparent at one time and since they were called out on it it has gone somewhat underground, but I can tell you for sure it still happens regularly. I actually have a friend who’s company has been given a contract to do just that! He’s had to sign a mountain of non-disclosures (and probably wouldn’t be to happy to know I was talking about him) but since I’m not divulging any real information I’m ok with it. Vevo is a marketing arm of a conglomeration of different record companies, they are using every trick in the book to promote certain artists and pump up the hype, YouTube views is just part of the hype. One billion views? Bullshit I say. Finally to answer the question I though was being asked from the thread title. I always thought music was somewhat less important overall to next generation of kids than it was to us. Just speaking from my kids and the many kids I know, they tend to have more broad media interests than I did at their age. Things like video games, other videos like sports, pranks, etc, social media, etc etc. When I was a kid music was a HUGE part of my life and we valued it more because we had to actually pay for it. But this is just my personal observation, perhaps it’s the same or even more. I’m sure some sociologist has studied it…it’s an interesting question.

    Some reactions, NL:

    —I did acknowledge up front in my post that I knew I wasn’t comparing apples-to-apples

    —6,000,000 in actual sales of “All About That Bass” is remarkable in an age rife with all the entertainment “distractions” you cited. That is fully half the number of “I Wanna Hold Your Hand,” arguably the most important single of the modern era, in an age where the music industry has been turned upside down by the internet, disintermediation, etc.

    —Your point about the fraudulence of YouTube view counts is well-taken. These tactics are well-known and I should have qualified my original remarks. But, that being said, in terms of relative numbers … this volume is remarkable.

    —The purpose of my post was to offer some evidence against my own theory that music has been marginalized and is not as important in pop culture as it used to be. I was simply trying to suggest that I may not have been looking in the right places or at the right data: pop music does appear to be alive and doing VERY well in some circles.

     

    October 28, 2015 at 11:47 pm #25714
    sonomastone
    Participant

    Pop music is more important than ever. I don’t know why anyone would think otherwise.

    My nine year old nephew visited me and taught me the “whip” and the “ney ney” and the words to a song about cocaine that 3 weeks later topped the charts called “I can’t feel my face when I’m with you” the kids are always plugged into pop music and the adults never are. It is just how it is.

     

     

    October 29, 2015 at 1:04 am #25722
    StrongBeach
    Participant

    Pop music is more important than ever. I don’t know why anyone would think otherwise. My nine year old nephew visited me and taught me the “whip” and the “ney ney” and the words to a song about cocaine that 3 weeks later topped the charts called “I can’t feel my face when I’m with you” the kids are always plugged into pop music and the adults never are. It is just how it is.

    That’s exactly what I hadn’t fully realized. I thought maybe something had changed with the primacy of music’s place in pop culture.

    October 29, 2015 at 2:13 am #25724
    Nikkei
    Participant

    Quite a Keef Moment you got there Stonehearted

    October 30, 2015 at 2:55 pm #25902
    shesarainbow
    Participant

    A couple important points here: First you can’t compare YouTube views to records sold or even the number of people who are hearing these songs. There is probably some girl in Utah who watches the video 100 times a day while watching herself dance in the mirror, and 1000’s more just like her scattered around the globe. Each time they watch it it is considered a view. Think about how many times you listened to your favorite tune, YouTube has become player for a lot of people, young and old. .

    Then again, every time someone watches a video again, that is additional exposure of the content, and sometimes those views by the same person are when they are showing the video to someone else.

    There is a reason they repeat “hits” on the radio.

    What I wonder is whether or not the view counts on YouTube are actually used in any sort of statistical sense.  When you think about it, 100 isn’t much compared to 1 billion.

    October 30, 2015 at 4:08 pm #25917
    Naturalust
    Participant

    A couple important points here: First you can’t compare YouTube views to records sold or even the number of people who are hearing these songs. There is probably some girl in Utah who watches the video 100 times a day while watching herself dance in the mirror, and 1000’s more just like her scattered around the globe. Each time they watch it it is considered a view. Think about how many times you listened to your favorite tune, YouTube has become player for a lot of people, young and old. .

    Then again, every time someone watches a video again, that is additional exposure of the content, and sometimes those views by the same person are when they are showing the video to someone else. There is a reason they repeat “hits” on the radio. What I wonder is whether or not the view counts on YouTube are actually used in any sort of statistical sense. When you think about it, 100 isn’t much compared to 1 billion.

    Yes there are tons of analytics and statistical data you can  get from videos you upload to YouTube. They study and publish the data amazingly well, frequency, how many mobile views, by country etc etc etc.  No doubt they do even more extensive analysis in house to determine how to better market their product.

    100 views may not seem like much on it’s own but multiply that by the 1,000 people who might watch it that often and that 1 billion turns into 10,000!

    November 2, 2015 at 4:14 pm #26302
    November 6, 2015 at 7:05 am #26972
    Hugh Janthem
    Participant

    LBA72 – in terms of media exposure, pop music has never had it so good.  There is a level of saturation into the home that could never have been envisioned in the 1960s.  The transient, good-looking, one-hit wonder pop star, as created and managed by Simon Cowell, is sitting secure and handsomely paid in the spotlight of the cultural mainstream.  Marginalisation never looked so far away.

     

    November 6, 2015 at 7:58 am #26974
    keefriffhards
    Participant

    I don’t think pop has any place in culture today, what’s cultured about it !!. Its soulless, benign, it has no direction or meaning. I have always disliked pop even when i was a teenager myself in England, but looking back it had something, be it punk , disco, Ska, mods, rockers, new wave, glam rock, whatever, it had attitude and you felt you had a choice to identify with a certain type of passion for  certain kinds of sounds or vibrations.  Today i don’t see that, the industry controls what’s in and what’s out. My son is at university  and he and his friends are musicians studying music, they are writing their own music and its great. I am just blown away with the talent coming from these young people, and i just know they will never get a look in. With the odd exception of people like Adele, its a closed shop that’s just marketing music without the LOVE ingredient. Its all about looks, its manufactured, the industry just seems to pick people out and mould them into a certain way like Miley Cyrus. Nothing home grown about it, its all contrived, and the world is going exactly the same way and people cant see it.

     

    November 6, 2015 at 12:08 pm #27027
    StrongBeach
    Participant

    I don’t know, Riffhards. The most “pop” of popular music has always been catchy, disposable, least-common-denominator type of stuff. Awful, in other words. 🙂 (Although I will always have a soft spot in my heart for Abba, who were genius.) I think a lot of this is generational and that music is as important in kids’ lives as it’s ever been. Music is ubiquitous and “consumed” in all kinds of ways that were not possible before (online and video games are two obvs examples).

    I think at a certain point in your life you sort of “lose touch” with current pop music. Sometimes that happens when you’re 25; sometimes not until you’re 40. The music you grow up with, which formed the soundtrack of your formative years is of course the music that most people hold dearest. I don’t think that will be any different for kids today, do you?

    The issue of objective “quality” is a hard one to pin down. I grew up in the “classic rock” era so it’s easy for me to say that there are no Stones, Beatles, Zeppelins, or Bowies on today’s scene. But I also know that both grunge and hip-hop, for example, neither of which is “my” music, produced GREAT records that will stand the test of time. Are there no artists today doing that level of work. I’m not sure … I do get the feeling that we may be on the cusp of the NEXT BIG SOUND. Hip-hop has played out, country has become corporate, EDM doesn’t seem to be growing as virally as it once was … and there are kids like your sons who are going back to playing real instruments. Maybe something huge and brilliant will come along, something we could never imagine today. It’s happened before, after all …

    November 6, 2015 at 1:09 pm #27030
    Breath
    Participant

    good post, LB.  and I’ve said before and I’ll say it again…there’s only two kinds of music: music you like and music you don’t like.  there’s no such thing as objectively good or bad music.  don’t make me say it again for awhile, please.

    November 6, 2015 at 3:38 pm #27062
    keefriffhards
    Participant

    I don’t know, Riffhards. The most “pop” of popular music has always been catchy, disposable, least-common-denominator type of stuff. Awful, in other words. :) (Although I will always have a soft spot in my heart for Abba, who were genius.) I think a lot of this is generational and that music is as important in kids’ lives as it’s ever been. Music is ubiquitous and “consumed” in all kinds of ways that were not possible before (online and video games are two obvs examples). I think at a certain point in your life you sort of “lose touch” with current pop music. Sometimes that happens when you’re 25; sometimes not until you’re 40. The music you grow up with, which formed the soundtrack of your formative years is of course the music that most people hold dearest. I don’t think that will be any different for kids today, do you? The issue of objective “quality” is a hard one to pin down. I grew up in the “classic rock” era so it’s easy for me to say that there are no Stones, Beatles, Zeppelins, or Bowies on today’s scene. But I also know that both grunge and hip-hop, for example, neither of which is “my” music, produced GREAT records that will stand the test of time. Are there no artists today doing that level of work. I’m not sure … I do get the feeling that we may be on the cusp of the NEXT BIG SOUND. Hip-hop has played out, country has become corporate, EDM doesn’t seem to be growing as virally as it once was … and there are kids like your sons who are going back to playing real instruments. Maybe something huge and brilliant will come along, something we could never imagine today. It’s happened before, after all …

    Amen to that longbeach, I agree with all said above, oh and i thought i was the only straight male on the planet who admits they love Abba lol

    November 6, 2015 at 3:41 pm #27066
    Breath
    Participant

    who doesn’t love ABBA?  whoever doesn’t is lying…

    November 6, 2015 at 4:16 pm #27068
    StrongBeach
    Participant

    good post, LB. and I’ve said before and I’ll say it again…there’s only two kinds of music: music you like and music you don’t like. there’s no such thing as objectively good or bad music. don’t make me say it again for awhile, please.

    Snob that I am, I used to hate this point of view. But, alas, I have grown to appreciate it as I’ve grown longer in the tooth. I do still believe that it is possible to talk about objective quality in the arts and that that conversation can be meaningful and can help lead you to a deeper appreciation of the works in question.

    But, at the end of the day, people can—and should—like what they like and jerks like me should not look down their noses at them.

    November 6, 2015 at 4:39 pm #27079
    Breath
    Participant

    good post, LB. and I’ve said before and I’ll say it again…there’s only two kinds of music: music you like and music you don’t like. there’s no such thing as objectively good or bad music. don’t make me say it again for awhile, please.

    Snob that I am, I used to hate this point of view. But, alas, I have grown to appreciate it as I’ve grown longer in the tooth. I do still believe that it is possible to talk about objective quality in the arts and that that conversation can be meaningful and can help lead you to a deeper appreciation of the works in question. But, at the end of the day, people can—and should—like what they like and jerks like me should not look down their noses at them.

    at least not when they’re looking.  whether we decide to laugh hysterically at their woeful tastes is another matter.

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