• December 29, 2015 at 8:16 am #32897
    keefriffhards
    Participant

    Lemmy  From Motorhead dies  age 70.   Gutted. Thought he was indestructible like our Keef.

    He lived life to the full, the way he wanted to live it, and that’s what counts.

    http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/dec/29/lemmy-lead-singer-of-motorhead-dies-at-70-after-battle-with-cancer

    December 29, 2015 at 12:24 pm #32917
    Cocaine Eyes
    Participant

    It’s all over the news and internet today. KRiff, I didn’t click on the link you gave but I just heard he was only diagnosed with cancer on 26th December. God bless him. The suffering was short.

    ~CE

    December 29, 2015 at 12:47 pm #32923
    Cocaine Eyes
    Participant

    Just found this:

    December 29, 2015 at 2:24 pm #32935
    stonehearted
    Participant

    I don’t buy this bit about cancer suddenly being discovered and this being the cause of death. It was congestive heart failure–as speculated by YouTube commenters beneath a clip showing recent footage of an award ceremony (BASS PLAYER LIVE! 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award) that Lemmy attended. His legs looked like pins. All the commenters were saying that he didn’t have another year, and they were right.

    He had been implanted more than 2 years ago with a cardiac defibrillator because of persistent heart problems, and then had to cancel a tour because of a hematoma, and even years before that had been diagnosed with diabetes.

     

    News of tour cancellation in 2013: http://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/jul/03/motorhead-cancel-tour-lemmy-health-hematoma

     

    In the recent documentary, 49% Motherfucker. 51% Son of a Bitch, he is shown in the recording studio taking his diabetes and blood pressure medications, which he proceeds to down with a pint glass of Jack and Coke. As he does this he jokes, “The doctor asks me how my blood pressure is. I tell him it’s pressing just fine.”

     

    His demise was no surprise. His only suffering was that he didn’t get to enjoy his drugs, drink, and cigarettes over the last couple years the way he used to.

    December 29, 2015 at 4:23 pm #32940
    D
    Keymaster

    Honestly I never fully understood Lemmy.  I know plenty of people who viewed him as a very honest and brutal guy.  Maybe one of you can point me in the right direction to get educated.

    December 29, 2015 at 4:26 pm #32943
    StrongBeach
    Participant

    Honestly I never fully understood Lemmy. I know plenty of people who viewed him as a very honest and brutal guy. Maybe one of you can point me in the right direction to get educated.

    I’ll go you one further: I don’t think I’ve ever heard a Motorhead song!

    December 29, 2015 at 5:14 pm #32976
    keefriffhards
    Participant

    I don’t think Lemmy made it as far as America, i think he was appreciated more for his tolerance to Jack Daniels than any musical accomplishments.  He lived on the road all his life touring with Motorhead in a coach touring bus. He was a no frills Rock n Roll kind of guy, relentlessly performing, shagging and drinking right up until recently. Unlike Keith he never stopped the Sex drugs and R&R lifestyle.

    So for that alone i mentioned him

     

    December 29, 2015 at 5:35 pm #32991
    stonehearted
    Participant

    For those unfamiliar with the work of the man who, in life, was Ian Fraser “Lemmy” Kilmister, he does actually have quite an interesting and varied musical pedigree that stretches almost as far back as that of the Stones.

     

    Lemmy first came to prominence, at least in the UK, as a guitarist with The Rockin’ Vickers (under the name Ian Willis), a band that was in the same studio production camp as The Who (Keith Moon even filled in as their drummer for several gigs when their own drummer [Cyril Shaw] couldn’t make it). As a result of this connection, the Vickers were handed a Pete Townshend demo to record, which turned out to be an early version of The Kids Are Alright and which received considerable air play from the offshore pirate radio stations like Radio Caroline upon its release in 1966.

     

    It’s Alright (produced by Glyn Johns):

     

     

     

    Lemmy as Ian Willis (right) with The Rockin’ Vickers

    Below, The Rockin’ Vickers in 1966 (Lemmy, second from right).

    Attachments:
    December 30, 2015 at 9:53 am #33040
    jasona93
    Participant

    Honestly I never fully understood Lemmy. I know plenty of people who viewed him as a very honest and brutal guy. Maybe one of you can point me in the right direction to get educated.

    I’m no fan of metal, but props to the guy for sticking to his guns that he was just a rock n roller, covering some of the greats, and his role (and street cred) in punk. The more I read about him and the kind of guy he was, the more I like. This feature/interview is pretty thorough and enjoyable:

    http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/vampire-of-the-sunset-strip-20091029

    And here’s some bonus Chuck Berry:

    December 30, 2015 at 10:29 am #33056
    D
    Keymaster

    That clip of Let It Rock is just plain fun.  To me there is always a season for most every type of music.  Right now I am digging into Goats Head Soup and then plenty of other music.  Winter…  This seems like Spring/Summer music for me.  Rocking out in good weather.

    December 30, 2015 at 11:43 am #33073
    andrew t
    Participant

    Of note to Stones fans would be the late 70’s albums Overkill and Bomber by Motorhead. They were produced by Jimmy Miller, who brought his sensibilities to Motorhead’s general cacophony and made two great sounding albums. Especially the drum sound, which is great on tracks like this boogie rocker:

     

    And this take on the classic Louie Louie:

     

     

    And from his Hawkwind days, the original Motorhead song..which is like Lemmy’s Before They Make Me Run.

     

    Sunrise, wrong side of another day,
    Sky high and six thousand miles away,
    Don’t know how long I’ve been awake,
    Wound up in an amazing state,
    Can’t get enough,
    And you know it’s righteous stuff,
    Goes up like prices at Christmas,
    Motörhead, you can call me Motörhead, alright
    Brain dead, total amnesia,
    Get some mental anaesthesia,
    Don’t move, I’ll shut the door and kill the lights,
    And if I can’t be wrong I could be right,
    All good clean fun,
    Have another stick of gum,
    Man, you look better already,
    Motörhead, remember me now Motörhead, alright
    Fourth day, five day marathon,
    We’re moving like a parallelogram,
    Don’t move, I’ll shut the door and kill the lights,
    I guess I’ll see you all on the ice,
    I should be tired,
    And all I am is wired,
    Ain’t felt this good for an hour,
    Motörhead, remember me now, Motörhead alright
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    December 30, 2015 at 2:55 pm #33086
    December 30, 2015 at 5:07 pm #33088
    stonehearted
    Participant

    When you listen to the vocal styling of Lemmy as an occasional lead singer with Hawkwind, as in this 1972 top five UK hit, Silver Machine, then you can see why Ozzy Osbourne was such a fan and considered Lemmy an influence.

    January 5, 2016 at 12:51 pm #33352
    Marianita
    Participant

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

    January 5, 2016 at 12:53 pm #33353
    Marianita
    Participant

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

    January 5, 2016 at 12:55 pm #33354
    Marianita
    Participant

    Turn up the volume

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

    January 5, 2016 at 2:05 pm #33370
    Marianita
    Participant

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

    January 6, 2016 at 8:15 am #33386
    Marianita
    Participant

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

    January 6, 2016 at 8:16 am #33387
    Marianita
    Participant

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

    January 6, 2016 at 8:16 am #33388
    Marianita
    Participant

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

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