• May 18, 2016 at 11:33 pm #47650
    LongBeachArena72
    Participant

    From his upcoming Stranger to Stranger album, due out 3 June. I’m not the hugest Simon fan but this track is utterly delightful. Hip, funky, topical, funny. Dig it!

    May 19, 2016 at 5:41 am #47656
    Marianita
    Participant

    Good song. Luckily for me i have some wristbands

    The Rolling Stones: It's Only Rock N Roll Wristband

    Rolling Stones - Wristband Metal Badge (in 21 cm)

    Rasta Color Friendship Bracelet with Marijuana Leaf by SSHOMEMADE:

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

    May 19, 2016 at 6:12 am #47659
    Marianita
    Participant

    New songs from Kvelertak

    Don't you think it's sometimes wise not to grow up?

    May 19, 2016 at 10:56 am #47684
    trumplefingers
    Participant

    as a Paul Simon aficionado I wanted to like it LB.  Lyrics were somewhat clever but really didn’t like the song per se.

    May 19, 2016 at 2:10 pm #47702
    LongBeachArena72
    Participant

    as a Paul Simon aficionado I wanted to like it LB. Lyrics were somewhat clever but really didn’t like the song per se.

    Perhaps the album’s opener (“The Werewolf”) might be more to your liking. Can be found here, amid a discussion of Pauls’s songwriting methods:

    http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2016/05/19/478510693/all-songs-1-a-conversation-with-paul-simon

    May 19, 2016 at 3:22 pm #47737
    Breath
    Participant

    Here’s Paul with the original aFisherionado

    May 20, 2016 at 5:13 pm #47827
    LongBeachArena72
    Participant

    Not to flog a dead horse—or a one-trick-pony—to death here, but I was captivated by this 35+ minute interview on songwriting with Paul Simon by Bob Boilen of NPR:

    http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2016/05/19/478510693/all-songs-1-a-conversation-with-paul-simon

    His discussion of song development and recording approaches is fascinating; this guy is clearly one of our greatest American pop treasures and hearing him talk about his craft—even if, like me, you are not a huuuuuge fan—is revelatory.

    And it really makes me hate The Glimmers even more. This type of glimpse behind-the-scenes is something that fans of any stripe eat up and the fact that a star of Simon’s wattage would get down in the weeds with an interviewer about how he does what he does is really a very generous gift to people interested in his music.

    May 20, 2016 at 8:33 pm #47850
    keefriffhards
    Participant

    Not to flog a dead horse—or a one-trick-pony—to death here, but I was captivated by this 35+ minute interview on songwriting with Paul Simon by Bob Boilen of NPR: http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2016/05/19/478510693/all-songs-1-a-conversation-with-paul-simon His discussion of song development and recording approaches is fascinating; this guy is clearly one of our greatest American pop treasures and hearing him talk about his craft—even if, like me, you are not a huuuuuge fan—is revelatory. And it really makes me hate The Glimmers even more. This type of glimpse behind-the-scenes is something that fans of any stripe eat up and the fact that a star of Simon’s wattage would get down in the weeds with an interviewer about how he does what he does is really a very generous gift to people interested in his music.

    I wonder Longbeach if that’s because Mick and Keith may not know how they do what they do. I get the feeling they don’t have much method, it just seems to come out from jamming along waiting for Keith to come up with something. I really don’t think its rocket science, i have songs just come to me all the time, i wake up with them in my head, where is the method in that. Can’t speak for Mick and how he brings his work to the table ( its in short supply lately ) but the consensus with Keith is he just jams about until incoming, or so he and the rest of them say. I’ll have a listen to Paul Simon now sounds interesting.

    May 22, 2016 at 1:50 pm #47912
    LongBeachArena72
    Participant

    Not to flog a dead horse—or a one-trick-pony—to death here, but I was captivated by this 35+ minute interview on songwriting with Paul Simon by Bob Boilen of NPR: http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2016/05/19/478510693/all-songs-1-a-conversation-with-paul-simon His discussion of song development and recording approaches is fascinating; this guy is clearly one of our greatest American pop treasures and hearing him talk about his craft—even if, like me, you are not a huuuuuge fan—is revelatory. And it really makes me hate The Glimmers even more. This type of glimpse behind-the-scenes is something that fans of any stripe eat up and the fact that a star of Simon’s wattage would get down in the weeds with an interviewer about how he does what he does is really a very generous gift to people interested in his music.

    I wonder Longbeach if that’s because Mick and Keith may not know how they do what they do. I get the feeling they don’t have much method, it just seems to come out from jamming along waiting for Keith to come up with something. I really don’t think its rocket science, i have songs just come to me all the time, i wake up with them in my head, where is the method in that. Can’t speak for Mick and how he brings his work to the table ( its in short supply lately ) but the consensus with Keith is he just jams about until incoming, or so he and the rest of them say. I’ll have a listen to Paul Simon now sounds interesting.

    It certainly could be that their methods are so organic/intuitive that they defy the kind of analysis/description that a songwriter like Paul Simon can offer. I don’t know enough about how songs are written to know if that’s likely to be the case. Dylan seems not to talk much about his “craft” or methods, although he does open up every now and again. I suppose one piece of evidence to buttress your argument is that The Stones haven’t really produced many songs of any lasting value since they stopped spending weeks/months in the studio noodling about in search of inspiration. It seems that, for the Glimmers, to just meet up and play each other their demos doesn’t yield any decent results. Another reason why an album put together out of a couple of days’ work on blues standards is unlikely to be worth a damn.

    May 23, 2016 at 2:09 am #47939
    trumplefingers
    Participant

    Not to flog a dead horse—or a one-trick-pony—to death here, but I was captivated by this 35+ minute interview on songwriting with Paul Simon by Bob Boilen of NPR: http://www.npr.org/sections/allsongs/2016/05/19/478510693/all-songs-1-a-conversation-with-paul-simon His discussion of song development and recording approaches is fascinating; this guy is clearly one of our greatest American pop treasures and hearing him talk about his craft—even if, like me, you are not a huuuuuge fan—is revelatory. And it really makes me hate The Glimmers even more. This type of glimpse behind-the-scenes is something that fans of any stripe eat up and the fact that a star of Simon’s wattage would get down in the weeds with an interviewer about how he does what he does is really a very generous gift to people interested in his music.

    I wonder Longbeach if that’s because Mick and Keith may not know how they do what they do. I get the feeling they don’t have much method, it just seems to come out from jamming along waiting for Keith to come up with something. I really don’t think its rocket science, i have songs just come to me all the time, i wake up with them in my head, where is the method in that. Can’t speak for Mick and how he brings his work to the table ( its in short supply lately ) but the consensus with Keith is he just jams about until incoming, or so he and the rest of them say. I’ll have a listen to Paul Simon now sounds interesting.

    It certainly could be that their methods are so organic/intuitive that they defy the kind of analysis/description that a songwriter like Paul Simon can offer. I don’t know enough about how songs are written to know if that’s likely to be the case. Dylan seems not to talk much about his “craft” or methods, although he does open up every now and again. I suppose one piece of evidence to buttress your argument is that The Stones haven’t really produced many songs of any lasting value since they stopped spending weeks/months in the studio noodling about in search of inspiration. It seems that, for the Glimmers, to just meet up and play each other their demos doesn’t yield any decent results. Another reason why an album put together out of a couple of days’ work on blues standards is unlikely to be worth a damn.

    if however you lower your expectations sufficiently this could be the best album since exile on main street.

    June 6, 2016 at 2:29 pm #48875
    stonehearted
    Participant

    the fact that a star of Simon’s wattage would get down in the weeds with an interviewer about how he does what he does is really a very generous gift to people interested in his music.

    More likely, it’s because Paul Simon is actually very modest and down-to-earth in everyday life. Not that I know him personally, but just judging from my one encounter, he is more unassuming than most would give him credit for.

     

    I was in a Whole Foods in Boston on January 8, 2014. This WF is just up the street and around the corner from the sports arena, TD Garden, the venue where I had taken in my first Stones concert just months before in summer 2013 and where, I later found when looking up the info online, Paul Simon would also be performing later in 2014 (with Sting on March 3). Who knows what brought him to this particular WF, I mean, my supermarket? But then again, he only lived next door in Connecticut and he could very well have been in town to meet with promoters.

     

    It was in the evening, already dark, and the place was not crowded as I’m entering the store getting ready to begin my shopping, when who do I see by the buffet counters getting himself a healthy looking green soup. He had on the same hat, the same loosened tie, the same dress shirt untucked beneath a tan blazer, and jeans and sneaks. He moved with a quick and fluid agility that belied his years and also with a sense of purpose that suggested great importance.

     

    I discarded my shopping basket as I hurried to a nearby aisle to grab a can of beans, then scampered back to the register nearest the door so I could stand behind Paul Simon as he checked out. He had set his container of soup down on the conveyer belt while waiting for the person ahead of him to complete a small transaction.

     

    At one point he turns to look at me. As he did so I casually turned my glance off to the left, not wanting to let on that he was the reason I had chosen to stand at this particular register at this particular time, holding only a can of beans (and this wasn’t even one of the express 12 items or less registers). He held his gaze in my general direction for quite some time, several seconds it seemed. Perhaps he was doing what other famous musicians from the 1960s who have spotted me in public had done – made a Brian Jones association.

     

    Then, he turns his gaze away and does something remarkable. He moves the grocery bar for me, so that I can set my item down on the conveyer belt behind his. In the next moment the cashier is attending to his purchase. When she asks him if he would like a bag, he just shrugs and says no in a very soft-spoken tone, his body language very humble as he reaches into his wallet to hand the cashier a twenty. Then he takes his change and his soup over to the counter by the windows and gets on his cell phone to make a call, pacing back and forth with erect posture and a sense of purpose to suggest that the call may have involved an important business matter.

     

    As the cashier, a young woman in her early twenties, is tending my transaction I ask her a question for which I also include the employee attending the bags at the end of the counter, a young man also in his early twenties. “Hey, didn’t that guy who was just here look like Paul Simon?” They answer: “Who?”

     

    As I leave the store I walk past the windows where Paul Simon is, still pacing about as he speaks into his phone, his free hand in his pants pocket. He does not notice me, and I make a point not to stare as I pass, but he doesn’t notice me now, as whatever it is that concerns his phone call takes up all his attention.

     

    For whatever reason, Paul Simon has always had a reputation among certain people as being not particularly nice, or perhaps even difficult. I was pissed when he took what was supposed to be a Simon and Garfunkel reunion album (1983’s Hearts and Bones) and wiped Art’s vocals and put it out instead as a solo album. Given that there are only five S&G studio albums, this would have been nice to have.

     

    But whatever you think of him, here’s what I found: In a supermarket, Paul Simon, one of the most important singer-songwriters to span the second half of the twentieth century, moved the bar for me. There are on a daily basis a great many Whole Fools at Whole Foods who will not move the bar for me, or for anyone else. But not Paul Simon, who showed me common courtesy and consideration.

     

    Someone else on another forum, a media figure who has sat down and talked with Paul as well as Art, has said that in everyday life they’re really just “gentle old hippies”. Based on my encounter, I would be inclined to agree.

     

    June 10, 2016 at 5:01 pm #49075
    stonehearted
    Participant

    Here’s a live version of Wristband performed on Garrison Keillor’s radio show A Prairie Home Companion on February 6 — the audience really enjoys both the song and it’s ironic sense of humor.

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    June 11, 2016 at 10:51 am #49136
    LongBeachArena72
    Participant

    Here’s a live version of Wristband performed on Garrison Keillor’s radio show A Prairie Home Companion

    Nice live version; thx, Stonehearted, for posting. That’s a deceptively difficult song to stay in tune on–good job by Mr Simon. But Prairie Home Companion? Christ, these Geritol rockers really are easing ever-so-inoffensively toward the pearly gates …
    June 11, 2016 at 2:10 pm #49157
    stonehearted
    Participant

    Prairie Home Companion? Christ, these Geritol rockers really are easing ever-so-inoffensively toward the pearly gates …

    No matter how one chooses to move toward the “Pearly Gates”, one is always moving by the ticking of The Clock….

     

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