• August 6, 2015 at 2:12 pm #5176
    Cocaine Eyes
    Participant

    As an addicted reader, I always like to know what others are reading. I have three books on the go right now:
    – Linwood Barclay’s Broken Promise

    – Stuart MacBride’s Flesh House

    – Angela Marsons’ Evil Games

    How about you guys?

    CE

    August 6, 2015 at 2:21 pm #5178
    Nikkei
    Participant

    Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. Actually finished, so moving on. It’s been suggested once too often.

    I have an actual James Bond novel (Casino Royale) being shipped to me. I bought it mostly for the sexy cover, don’t know if it has literary value.
    But this Fleming guy has written it, so it’s not a stupid after-a-movie novel.

    August 6, 2015 at 2:28 pm #5187
    CindyC
    Participant

    In the summer, I only read fluff/trash. I just read Night Circus and The Pub Across the Pond and it was adorable. Now I’m reading A Dirty Job.

    Wasn't looking too good, but I was feeling real well

    August 6, 2015 at 2:29 pm #5188
    Stoneburst
    Participant

    I’m trying to finish my PhD at the moment, which isn’t leaving me a lot of time of pleasure reading, so things related to my work – revolutionary memoirs from pre-1917 Russia, mostly.

    August 6, 2015 at 2:29 pm #5189
    BeforeTheyMakeMeRun
    Participant

    Stephen King’s Firestarter. I also ordered Adam Ant’s autobiography, which I’m eagerly waiting for mailman to drop off.

    August 6, 2015 at 3:02 pm #5198
    Breath
    Participant

    In the summer, I only read fluff/trash.

    the rest of the time you read just pure filth?

    August 6, 2015 at 3:04 pm #5201
    Nikkei
    Participant

    In the summer, I only read fluff/trash.

    the rest of the time you read just pure filth?

    your scope surprises me

    August 6, 2015 at 3:05 pm #5202
    Breath
    Participant

    good thread. i’ll only read non-fiction, typically just history and bios, unless somebody like erik snow sends me some weirdish novel by some weirdish norwegian novelist.

    got a bunch going concurrently:

    a history of the jews by paul johnson
    being nixon by evan thomas
    the leo frank case by leonard dinnerstein
    unforgiveable blackness by geoffrecy c. ward
    the last zero fighter by dan king
    dresden by frederick taylor
    the wright brothers by david mccullough

    with another batch waiting on deck

    August 6, 2015 at 3:09 pm #5205
    Nikkei
    Participant

    Being Nixon, how’s that working out? Do you have a particular reason for not being into fiction?
    There’s some books crossing the line between historical and fictional to the most jarring effect.

    August 6, 2015 at 3:13 pm #5206
    Breath
    Participant

    Being Nixon, how’s that working out? Do you have a particular reason for not being into fiction?
    There’s some books crossing the line between historical and fictional to the most jarring effect.

    just starting that one – read the other recent nixon book by tim weiner – it was good. they both rely on recently declassified docs and tapes. nixon was a fascinating character – shakespearean tragic hero…or something.

    always been a history guy since i was a wee lad…first book i can remember reading was about the hindenburg disaster. i’ve read plenty of fiction, but am generally bored by others imaginations of real life – rather just go to the actual things. how did we get so fucked up in this world, anyway? just read and find out!

    August 6, 2015 at 3:18 pm #5208
    Nikkei
    Participant

    I started out to describe how I pursue similar interests over the net, but came to realize that this is not the thread to go OT like that. I’d have to ask: Did you ever read Günter Grass? He’s way more popular in your country yet the only german author whose language and style I truly can’t imagine in english. Very colourful and primal. Apparently it translates well

    August 6, 2015 at 3:25 pm #5209
    Breath
    Participant

    I started out do describe how I pursue similar interests over the net, but came to realize that this is not the thread to go OT like that. I’d have to ask: Did you ever read Günter Grass? He’s way more popular in your country yet the only german author whose language and style I truly can’t imagine in english. Very colourful and primal. Apparently it translates well

    have not. make some suggestions. i read voraciously on the two world wars, from authors from all sides and fronts.

    August 6, 2015 at 3:35 pm #5211
    Nikkei
    Participant

    I started out do describe how I pursue similar interests over the net, but came to realize that this is not the thread to go OT like that. I’d have to ask: Did you ever read Günter Grass? He’s way more popular in your country yet the only german author whose language and style I truly can’t imagine in english. Very colourful and primal. Apparently it translates well

    have not. make some suggestions. i read voraciously on the two world wars, from authors from all sides and fronts.

    Well I’ve been told his american readers still admire Local Anaesthetic very much, but it’s been actually a lame try of him to become “relevant” writing about the 1968 protest spirit chasing its own tail. I would actually suggest The Flounder to you which is a broad history of mankind, civilization and the evolution of cooking. His plots are usually highly interwoven and in The Flounder he’s always the same narrator dealing with different women in different ages. It starts off in Stone Age with matriarchy firmly in place. Old guys with no teeth get to suck bewbs again so everyone’s happy. But the Flounder, a speaking fish, helps the man to mark dates and write history and gradually confine the woman to the kitchen. Which is overwith in the “present plot” where a group of feminists puts said fish on trial for enforcing patriarchy. The idea of the speaking fish derives from a fairy tale you hopefully heard. You see, it’s difficult to explain, but probably worth your time. I won’t do the obvious thing and suggest The Tin Drum.

    August 6, 2015 at 3:37 pm #5212
    Breath
    Participant

    thanks – will check these out.

    August 6, 2015 at 3:38 pm #5213
    Cocaine Eyes
    Participant

    I find all of this very interesting because I’ve never been an autobiography/biography reader nor have I been a history reader. Keep it coming people; this fascinates me.

    CE

    August 6, 2015 at 3:40 pm #5214
    Breath
    Participant

    CE: i try to focus my reading on books that discuss the most horrific episodes in human history. unnecessary, massive human suffering is key to good reading. helps calm the nerves and soothes the soul. hope that helps.

    August 6, 2015 at 3:40 pm #5215
    Nikkei
    Participant

    thanks – will check these out.

    be sure to tell me if it’s good language. the translation you know. massive human suffering is involved. as you said earlier, man fucked it up alright.

    August 6, 2015 at 3:47 pm #5218
    Breath
    Participant

    I’m trying to finish my PhD at the moment, which isn’t leaving me a lot of time of pleasure reading, so things related to my work – revolutionary memoirs from pre-1917 Russia, mostly.

    send me the finished dissertation….sounds interesting.

    August 6, 2015 at 4:52 pm #5234
    ReginaPhalange
    Participant

    CE, I got an email this morning that the new Linwood Barclay book is available for me at the library. I’ll be picking it up tomorrow after work.

    August 6, 2015 at 4:58 pm #5237
    Stoneburst
    Participant

    I’m trying to finish my PhD at the moment, which isn’t leaving me a lot of time of pleasure reading, so things related to my work – revolutionary memoirs from pre-1917 Russia, mostly.

    send me the finished dissertation….sounds interesting.

    you might be waiting a while (probably not submitting it until earlyish next year) but interest much appreciated, needless to say.

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